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Bob Carroll
Bob Carroll
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Child-Related Malpractice Payments Studied

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The medical journal, PEDIATRICS, is featuring an article entitled What Pediatricians Should Know About Child-Related Malpractice Payments in the United States.

The purpose of this study was to examine child-related National Practitioner Data Bank data.

[During] the period from February 1, 2004, through December 31, 2005, a total of 30195 malpractice payments were made on behalf of practitioners in the United States; 14% of those payments (4107 of 30195 payments) were child related.

The average child-related malpractice payment was significantly greater than an adult-related malpractice payment ($422,000 vs $247,000).

Failure to diagnose was the leading reason for child-related payments (18%), followed by improper performance (9%), delay in diagnosis (9%), and improper management (6%).

I thought the article was doing its best to inform doctors and the public about the medical errors that injure or kill children. Then I read the conclusion.

CONCLUSION. Practicing pediatricians should be aware of the existence of a mandatory electronic depository that documents all malpractice settlements and judgments involving practitioners.

Is this really what pediatricians should know about child-related malpractice payments in the United States?

The medical journal, PEDIATRICS, is featuring an article entitled What Pediatricians Should Know About Child-Related Malpractice Payments in the United States.

The purpose of this study was to examine child-related National Practitioner Data Bank data.

[During] the period from February 1, 2004, through December 31, 2005, a total of 30195 malpractice payments were made on behalf of practitioners in the United States; 14% of those payments (4107 of 30195 payments) were child related.

The average child-related malpractice payment was significantly greater than an adult-related malpractice payment ($422,000 vs $247,000).

Failure to diagnose was the leading reason for child-related payments (18%), followed by improper performance (9%), delay in diagnosis (9%), and improper management (6%).

I thought the article was doing its best to inform doctors and the public about the medical errors that injure or kill children. Then I read the conclusion.

CONCLUSION. Practicing pediatricians should be aware of the existence of a mandatory electronic depository that documents all malpractice settlements and judgments involving practitioners.

Is this really what pediatricians should know about child-related malpractice payments in the United States?