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Bob Carroll
Bob Carroll
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Cato Institute: Tort Reform Rhetoric Misleading

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In case anyone is interested in the underlying facts that are supposedly the driving force behind the claimed need for continued Tort Reform, particularly in the field of Medical Malpractice, there is this post at Evan Schaeffer’s Legal Underground:

CATO INSTITUTE QUESTIONS LINK BETWEEN MEDICAL MALPRACTICE PAYOUTS AND INSURANCE PREMIUMS . . . In “Defensive Medicine and Disappearing Doctors,” Katherine Baicker and Amitabh Chandra find that “when the number or size of malpractice payments rises, there is very little accompanying increase in the malpractice premiums paid by physicians.”

“There is a great deal of public debate about potential reforms of the malpractice system. A closer look at available data suggests that some of the rhetoric surrounding this debate may be misleading. First, increases in malpractice premiums do not seem to be the driving force behind increases in premiums. Second, increases in malpractice costs do not seem to affect the overall size of the physician workforce, although they may affect some subsets of the physician population more severely.”

In case anyone is interested in the underlying facts that are supposedly the driving force behind the claimed need for continued Tort Reform, particularly in the field of Medical Malpractice, there is this post at Evan Schaeffer’s Legal Underground:

CATO INSTITUTE QUESTIONS LINK BETWEEN MEDICAL MALPRACTICE PAYOUTS AND INSURANCE PREMIUMS . . . In “Defensive Medicine and Disappearing Doctors,” Katherine Baicker and Amitabh Chandra find that “when the number or size of malpractice payments rises, there is very little accompanying increase in the malpractice premiums paid by physicians.”

“There is a great deal of public debate about potential reforms of the malpractice system. A closer look at available data suggests that some of the rhetoric surrounding this debate may be misleading. First, increases in malpractice premiums do not seem to be the driving force behind increases in premiums. Second, increases in malpractice costs do not seem to affect the overall size of the physician workforce, although they may affect some subsets of the physician population more severely.”